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Posts Tagged ‘Top tips’

Tips on Looking After Your Eyes

September 20th, 2017 / View in own page?

This week (18-24 September) is National Eye Health Week which encourages people to look after their eyes and shows the importance of doing so. Here at LOOK, we wanted to get involved so thought that we would share some simple tips with you on looking after your eyes.

A report published by the RNIB, states that 250 people start to lose their sight every day and 1 in 5 people will live with sight loss in their lifetime. These are just some of the statistics that show that eye health really matters.

There are many simple things that you can do to take better care of your eyes.

Quit smoking

Smoking can cause many health problems, including the risk of some eye conditions. Tobacco can damage the eye.

 

Eat healthy

You may hear this all the time, but eating healthy can help protect your sight.

 

Think of your eyes when using a computer

If you spend several hours a day on a computer, remember the 20-20-20 rule: look 20 feet in front of you for 20 seconds every 20 minutes. Also, make sure you blink whilst you’re using a computer, as this helps to keep your eyes moist. Computer screens can make your eyes feel tired, itchy, cause blurred vision, cause headaches and computers can even cause eye strain.

 

Protect your eyes in the sun

Wear sunglasses when you are exposed to the sun. This can prevent some eye conditions such as cataract. When you are buying some new sunglasses, make sure they have a CE, British Standard, or UV 400 mark as this means that they have good protection.

 

Watch your weight

Obesity can put you at higher risk of some eye conditions such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma.

 

Look for changes in your vision.

These may include: double vision, hazy vision, difficulty seeing in low light, red eyes, frequent flashes of light, floaters, and eye pain. If you experience any of these then it is important to speak to an eye specialist.

 

Have regular eye tests

It is recommended that you should have an eye test every two years, unless you are told otherwise. If you haven’t had an eye test within the last two years then why not book one this national eye health week?

We know that not all eye conditions can be prevented, but it is very important to look after your eyes. Eye health is just as important as physical or mental health!

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Transitioning to University

September 6th, 2017 / View in own page?

September is often the month of transitions: transitioning to a new school or college, transitioning to university or starting a new job. Whatever it may be, change can be scary, but it can also be positive. In this blog post, Brigitta discusses her thoughts and feelings about change, and she also shares some top tips for blind or visually impaired students starting university. So if you’re a fresher, then you may find this post helpful!

 

Change can cause mixed feelings. Some people will be excited about change, some people will be nervous about change. But whatever your feelings about it, change can be a positive thing.

In the past change was scary to me. When I started secondary school I was terrified, the same with college, university and even starting a new job. On top of these changes I had the added challenge of making these changes with my visual impairment. However, every time I made these changes I eventually settled down and my surroundings began to become more familiar.

My biggest challenge so far has been university. I study Anthropology at Oxford Brookes. I chose this university for the course and because the support network here is very good for disabled students. As a VI student, finding a university with good disability support was important. I needed to make sure the university would support me and provide me with what I needed. Researching your university and getting in touch with their support team is something I would really recommend doing. Then you can discuss with them what you will need and how they can aid you.

If you’re moving into halls or shared residency when you start university, I think being open and honest with your new flatmates is always a good thing and even breaks down a couple of awkward barriers. From telling your new flatmates about your visual impairment you can ask them for help, such as reading a label or using the cooker. Don’t be afraid to be open about your condition. This is true in lectures and seminars too.

My biggest and scariest challenge for me was finding my way around university and finding my lecture rooms. I spoke to my disability adviser and they helped immensely. I had someone show me around the main campus and where some of my lectures could be. Then they set up for someone to meet me at my halls and walk me to my lecture room for the first few weeks. If you’re worried about finding your lectures, I would highly recommend you to ask the disability support at your university to set up a guide for you in the first few weeks.

Student tip: buy a pizza wheel. Best thing I took with me.

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